Saturday, June 30, 2012

Questions That Will Help you Ace the End of the Interview

So you’ve made it over the first hurdle, you secured yourself an interview, did all of your research and aced all of the questions your interviewer had. Now, it’s your turn. At the end of the interview, there is always the dreaded “do you have any questions?” question that many applicants walk in unprepared for. This moment is just as important as the questions the interviewer asks because it is your chance to make sure they are a great fit for you, not just you for them. Here is a list of questions that give the interviewer the chance to really breakdown the organization to you: 

1.Can you give me some examples of what a typical day would look like in this position? 
Asking this question can get you truly prepared for what is to come. The worst feelings is arriving at a new job and realizing you are in over your head, or that you are walking into a position you won’t utilize all yours skills.

2.Where do you think the company is headed in the next 5 years?
This question not only shows that you are interested in the well-being of the company long-term, but also that you can compare your goals to where this job may progress to. 

3.What do you like best about working for this company?
This helps decipher the kind of atmosphere you are about to get into. For instance, if the interviewer were to respond that they love the laidback vibe all the managers give and you are someone who needs an authoritarian figure, this may not be the place for you.

4.What are the opportunities for growth and career advancement?
This question serves two purposes. One- It helps you to understand where the job may 
lead and the skills you might acquire. Two-it also signals that you are ambitious and thinking ahead.

5.Why did you come to work here? What keeps you here?
When you ask questions directly about the interviewer, they remember that you care about them as a person, not just the potential paycheck that could come from meeting them.

The saying goes that if you do something you love, you will never work a day in your life. These questions can give you insight into more than just a job description. They benefit both parties involved. You can see if this is somewhere you would want to work, as well as show the interviewer you are a strong candidate for the position they are trying to fill. 

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